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A raw hamachi dish garnished with dill, watercress, and pickled radish flowers.
The Japanese hamachi crudo from Aquavit.
Courtesy of JFOODO

10 Great Places to Try Hamachi Right Now

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The Japanese hamachi crudo from Aquavit.
| Courtesy of JFOODO
This advertising content was produced in collaboration between Vox Creative and our sponsor, without involvement from Vox Media editorial staff.

Hamachi is a type of fish that goes by several names — Japanese amberjack, yellowtail, buri — but whatever you call it, most will agree it’s delicious. Extremely popular in Japan, it’s native to that country’s coast and is especially appreciated in the colder months when the fish have a higher fat content. It can be eaten raw or cooked and is juicy, flavorful, and tender either way. Thankfully, it’s now fairly easy to find Japanese hamachi in the U.S. and restaurants around the country have crafted hamachi dishes well worth trying. (From January 27 to February 28, 10 top chefs in New York City and Los Angeles will also add a specially crafted hamachi dish to their menus.) Here are 10 standout places to try hamachi in a variety of preparations — we won’t judge if you want to try them all!

The latest CDC guidance for vaccinated diners during the COVID-19 outbreak is here; dining out still carries risks for unvaccinated diners and workers. Please be aware of changing local rules, and check individual restaurant websites for any additional restrictions such as mask requirements. Find a local vaccination site here.

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THE GALLERY by odo

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Chef Hiroki Odo opened THE GALLERY by odo in 2021 after previous success with The Chef’s Counter at odo. Combining art with food, THE GALLERY by odo is a space where guests can casually enjoy the season’s best ingredients while also appreciating rotating exhibitions of different artists. Try the Hamachi Daikon, created by Executive Culinary Director Manabu Asanuma, for a modern take on a traditional winter dish that will be served as a supplementary option in the restaurant’s tasting course. The simmering hamachi, daikon radish, array of root vegetables, the umami from the dashi, and the tenderness of the hamachi will be sure to keep you warm during the cold weather. 

Manabu Asanuma, and a hamachi dish topped with root vegetables served in a blue and white porcelain bowl.
Executive Culinary Director Manabu Asanuma and odo’s Hamachi Daikon.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Traditional sushi at an izakaya near Grand Central is the name of the game at Wokuni. While most izakayas don’t serve sushi, Wokuni offers remarkably fresh sushi, sashimi, and rolls at reasonable prices — hamachi included — thanks to the fact that it sources much of its fish from its own fish farm in Nagasaki. Chef Kuniaki Yoshizawa creates his Hamachi Aburi Sushi using the traditional Japanese nigiri technique. The simple ingredients (including sumeshi, or vinegar rice) bring out the flavor of the hamachi, which is also lightly flame-seared to add a smoky flavor. Overall, it’s an authentically Japanese way to enjoy hamachi, and a way to enjoy the difference between raw and seared hamachi nigiri.

Kuniaki Yoshizawa, and a piece of nigiri sushi topped with lightly flame-seared hamachi on a black plate.
Chef Kuniaki Yoshizawa and Wokuni’s Hamachi Aburi Sushi.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Aquavit

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This Nordic fine dining restaurant has accumulated two Michelin stars and countless other accolades through the years. Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson puts her Scandinavian roots to good use and incorporates seafood and fish to showcase Nordic ingredients on the five-course tasting menu, chef’s menu, and a la carte bar menu. What to order? The Japanese hamachi crudo, which is prepared with apple brunoises and seasoned with a sea buckthorn vinaigrette dressing. The finely-cured hamachi is rich yet crisp, and is garnished with dill, watercress, and pickled radish flowers.

Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson, and a raw hamachi dish garnished with dill, watercress, and pickled radish flowers
Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson and Aquavit’s hamachi crudo.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Veranda

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Acclaimed chef George Mendes opened Veranda in 2021 after bidding adieu to his beloved Aldea in early 2020. For this venture, he partnered with restaurateur David Rabin on a modern spot inside the Modernhaus SoHo hotel. The menu leans Portuguese (Mendes’ native country) but with an American accent, and fish and seafood are heavily featured. Mendes’ Hamachi Confit maximizes the rich flavor of the Japanese hamachi, as the thick slices are cooked slowly until tender. The dish is then garnished with seasonal black truffle purée, fresh truffles, and hon shimeji mushrooms. A ginger dashi sauce adds extra umami to the dish.

George Mendes, and a hamachi dish topped with fresh truffles and mushrooms.
Executive Chef George Mendes and Veranda’s Hamachi Confit.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Llama San

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Although the menu at Llama San changes often, the raw Hamachi Tiradito is a perfect example of the inventive Nikkei (Japanese-Peruvian) cuisine that makes up the food items on offer any given day. The fresh raw hamachi, spiced with habanero sauce and mellowed with coconut sauce, is topped with a whisked matcha sauce and crispy coconut chips (for added texture). Chef Erik Ramirez, whose grandmother is Nikkei, opened the attractive minimalist West Village space in 2019, after success with his first restaurant Llama Inn. Since then, it’s become a city favorite (and remains one of the only Nikkei restaurants in Manhattan).

Erik Ramirez, and a raw hamachi dish with uni, coconut, and matcha.
Head Chef Erik Ramirez and Llama San’s Hamachi Tiradito.
Courtesy of JFOODO
Read Review |

Contra, one of New York’s most-heralded restaurants, is known for innovative and uber-seasonal fare that changes almost daily. While you’re there, indulge in Chef Jeremiah Stone and Chef Fabian Von Hauske’s oil-poached Japanese hamachi with radish broth and charred scallions. The scallions are charred overnight to infuse a smoky flavor — paired with the creamy Japanese hamachi, every bite will melt in your mouth.

Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske, and an oil-poached hamachi dish on a white plate.
Chefs Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske with their oil-poached hamachi dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

The Musket Room

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While this casual fine-dining spot initially became known for serving upscale New Zealand cuisine, it reinvented itself in early 2020 with chef Mary Attea, and again after the first wave of the pandemic. Now, it’s a welcoming spot serving excellent food that draws on Attea’s Lebanese American heritage and her world travels. Attea’s Japanese hamachi crudo dish features hamachi prepared with winter citrus vinaigrette, pistachio purée, and pink variegated lemon. The lemons and the hamachi are both lightly torched, adding a smoky contrast to the brightness of the citrus. All of the flavors also pair well with the tender richness of the hamachi.

Mary Attea, and a raw hamachi dish topped with winter citrus vinaigrette, pistachio purée, and pink variegated lemon.
Chef Mary Attea and The Musket Room’s Japanese hamachi crudo dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Providence

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A wild-caught, sustainable seafood-focused fine-dining institution by Chef Michael Cimarusti, Providence has garnered countless accolades and awards. The $250 chef’s tasting menu at dinner mainly focuses on California and New England seafood, but Japanese seafood occasionally makes an appearance. A crowd favorite is the Wild Japanese Buri with crème fraîche, wasabi, shiso, and celtuce — the slightly spiced wasabi balances out the fatty wild buri.

Michael Cimarusti, and pieces of hamachi, shiso and celtuce constructed in a flower-like shape, served on a white plate.
Chef Michael Cimarusti and Providence’s Wild Japanese Buri.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Chef Josiah Citrin’s previous Santa Monica restaurant was reimagined as two unique restaurants, Citrin and Melissé, in 2019. Located under the same roof, Citrin is a modern Californian restaurant while Melissé offers a tasting menu experience where the dining room and kitchen are one. Via a la carte and prix fixe menus, Citrin offers some die-hard former Melissé classics like Lobster Bolognese or Egg Caviar, a soft poached egg with caviar. Citrin also offers more modern dishes like the Crudo of Japanese Hamachi, made with radish, fermented chili, enoki mushrooms, and yuzu kosho.

Josiah Citrin, and a raw hamachi dish made with radish, fermented chili, enoki mushrooms, and yuzu kosho.
Chef Josiah Citrin and Citrin’s Crudo of Japanese Hamachi.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Shibumi

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From Chef David Schlosser, Shibumi is a chic one-Michelin-starred kaiseki Japanese restaurant serving Kappo cuisine in the heart of DTLA. Diners will enjoy the parade of dishes, like the Japanese hamachi with hoshigaki and ginger, served on gorgeous ceramics imported from Japan. Complement the meal with a selection from the lengthy sake and shochu list, or try a classic cocktail made with Japanese spirits.

David Schlosser, and a hamachi dish with hoshigaki and ginger served on a wood board.
Chef David Schlosser and Shibumi’s hamachi dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO
This advertising content was produced in collaboration between Vox Creative and our sponsor, without involvement from Vox Media editorial staff.

THE GALLERY by odo

Manabu Asanuma, and a hamachi dish topped with root vegetables served in a blue and white porcelain bowl.
Executive Culinary Director Manabu Asanuma and odo’s Hamachi Daikon.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Chef Hiroki Odo opened THE GALLERY by odo in 2021 after previous success with The Chef’s Counter at odo. Combining art with food, THE GALLERY by odo is a space where guests can casually enjoy the season’s best ingredients while also appreciating rotating exhibitions of different artists. Try the Hamachi Daikon, created by Executive Culinary Director Manabu Asanuma, for a modern take on a traditional winter dish that will be served as a supplementary option in the restaurant’s tasting course. The simmering hamachi, daikon radish, array of root vegetables, the umami from the dashi, and the tenderness of the hamachi will be sure to keep you warm during the cold weather. 

Manabu Asanuma, and a hamachi dish topped with root vegetables served in a blue and white porcelain bowl.
Executive Culinary Director Manabu Asanuma and odo’s Hamachi Daikon.
Courtesy of JFOODO

WOKUNI

Kuniaki Yoshizawa, and a piece of nigiri sushi topped with lightly flame-seared hamachi on a black plate.
Chef Kuniaki Yoshizawa and Wokuni’s Hamachi Aburi Sushi.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Traditional sushi at an izakaya near Grand Central is the name of the game at Wokuni. While most izakayas don’t serve sushi, Wokuni offers remarkably fresh sushi, sashimi, and rolls at reasonable prices — hamachi included — thanks to the fact that it sources much of its fish from its own fish farm in Nagasaki. Chef Kuniaki Yoshizawa creates his Hamachi Aburi Sushi using the traditional Japanese nigiri technique. The simple ingredients (including sumeshi, or vinegar rice) bring out the flavor of the hamachi, which is also lightly flame-seared to add a smoky flavor. Overall, it’s an authentically Japanese way to enjoy hamachi, and a way to enjoy the difference between raw and seared hamachi nigiri.

Kuniaki Yoshizawa, and a piece of nigiri sushi topped with lightly flame-seared hamachi on a black plate.
Chef Kuniaki Yoshizawa and Wokuni’s Hamachi Aburi Sushi.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Aquavit

Read Review |
Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson, and a raw hamachi dish garnished with dill, watercress, and pickled radish flowers
Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson and Aquavit’s hamachi crudo.
Courtesy of JFOODO

This Nordic fine dining restaurant has accumulated two Michelin stars and countless other accolades through the years. Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson puts her Scandinavian roots to good use and incorporates seafood and fish to showcase Nordic ingredients on the five-course tasting menu, chef’s menu, and a la carte bar menu. What to order? The Japanese hamachi crudo, which is prepared with apple brunoises and seasoned with a sea buckthorn vinaigrette dressing. The finely-cured hamachi is rich yet crisp, and is garnished with dill, watercress, and pickled radish flowers.

Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson, and a raw hamachi dish garnished with dill, watercress, and pickled radish flowers
Executive Chef Emma Bengtsson and Aquavit’s hamachi crudo.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Veranda

George Mendes, and a hamachi dish topped with fresh truffles and mushrooms.
Executive Chef George Mendes and Veranda’s Hamachi Confit.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Acclaimed chef George Mendes opened Veranda in 2021 after bidding adieu to his beloved Aldea in early 2020. For this venture, he partnered with restaurateur David Rabin on a modern spot inside the Modernhaus SoHo hotel. The menu leans Portuguese (Mendes’ native country) but with an American accent, and fish and seafood are heavily featured. Mendes’ Hamachi Confit maximizes the rich flavor of the Japanese hamachi, as the thick slices are cooked slowly until tender. The dish is then garnished with seasonal black truffle purée, fresh truffles, and hon shimeji mushrooms. A ginger dashi sauce adds extra umami to the dish.

George Mendes, and a hamachi dish topped with fresh truffles and mushrooms.
Executive Chef George Mendes and Veranda’s Hamachi Confit.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Llama San

Read Review |
Erik Ramirez, and a raw hamachi dish with uni, coconut, and matcha.
Head Chef Erik Ramirez and Llama San’s Hamachi Tiradito.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Although the menu at Llama San changes often, the raw Hamachi Tiradito is a perfect example of the inventive Nikkei (Japanese-Peruvian) cuisine that makes up the food items on offer any given day. The fresh raw hamachi, spiced with habanero sauce and mellowed with coconut sauce, is topped with a whisked matcha sauce and crispy coconut chips (for added texture). Chef Erik Ramirez, whose grandmother is Nikkei, opened the attractive minimalist West Village space in 2019, after success with his first restaurant Llama Inn. Since then, it’s become a city favorite (and remains one of the only Nikkei restaurants in Manhattan).

Erik Ramirez, and a raw hamachi dish with uni, coconut, and matcha.
Head Chef Erik Ramirez and Llama San’s Hamachi Tiradito.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Contra

Read Review |
Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske, and an oil-poached hamachi dish on a white plate.
Chefs Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske with their oil-poached hamachi dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Contra, one of New York’s most-heralded restaurants, is known for innovative and uber-seasonal fare that changes almost daily. While you’re there, indulge in Chef Jeremiah Stone and Chef Fabian Von Hauske’s oil-poached Japanese hamachi with radish broth and charred scallions. The scallions are charred overnight to infuse a smoky flavor — paired with the creamy Japanese hamachi, every bite will melt in your mouth.

Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske, and an oil-poached hamachi dish on a white plate.
Chefs Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske with their oil-poached hamachi dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

The Musket Room

Mary Attea, and a raw hamachi dish topped with winter citrus vinaigrette, pistachio purée, and pink variegated lemon.
Chef Mary Attea and The Musket Room’s Japanese hamachi crudo dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

While this casual fine-dining spot initially became known for serving upscale New Zealand cuisine, it reinvented itself in early 2020 with chef Mary Attea, and again after the first wave of the pandemic. Now, it’s a welcoming spot serving excellent food that draws on Attea’s Lebanese American heritage and her world travels. Attea’s Japanese hamachi crudo dish features hamachi prepared with winter citrus vinaigrette, pistachio purée, and pink variegated lemon. The lemons and the hamachi are both lightly torched, adding a smoky contrast to the brightness of the citrus. All of the flavors also pair well with the tender richness of the hamachi.

Mary Attea, and a raw hamachi dish topped with winter citrus vinaigrette, pistachio purée, and pink variegated lemon.
Chef Mary Attea and The Musket Room’s Japanese hamachi crudo dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Providence

Michael Cimarusti, and pieces of hamachi, shiso and celtuce constructed in a flower-like shape, served on a white plate.
Chef Michael Cimarusti and Providence’s Wild Japanese Buri.
Courtesy of JFOODO

A wild-caught, sustainable seafood-focused fine-dining institution by Chef Michael Cimarusti, Providence has garnered countless accolades and awards. The $250 chef’s tasting menu at dinner mainly focuses on California and New England seafood, but Japanese seafood occasionally makes an appearance. A crowd favorite is the Wild Japanese Buri with crème fraîche, wasabi, shiso, and celtuce — the slightly spiced wasabi balances out the fatty wild buri.

Michael Cimarusti, and pieces of hamachi, shiso and celtuce constructed in a flower-like shape, served on a white plate.
Chef Michael Cimarusti and Providence’s Wild Japanese Buri.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Citrin

Josiah Citrin, and a raw hamachi dish made with radish, fermented chili, enoki mushrooms, and yuzu kosho.
Chef Josiah Citrin and Citrin’s Crudo of Japanese Hamachi.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Chef Josiah Citrin’s previous Santa Monica restaurant was reimagined as two unique restaurants, Citrin and Melissé, in 2019. Located under the same roof, Citrin is a modern Californian restaurant while Melissé offers a tasting menu experience where the dining room and kitchen are one. Via a la carte and prix fixe menus, Citrin offers some die-hard former Melissé classics like Lobster Bolognese or Egg Caviar, a soft poached egg with caviar. Citrin also offers more modern dishes like the Crudo of Japanese Hamachi, made with radish, fermented chili, enoki mushrooms, and yuzu kosho.

Josiah Citrin, and a raw hamachi dish made with radish, fermented chili, enoki mushrooms, and yuzu kosho.
Chef Josiah Citrin and Citrin’s Crudo of Japanese Hamachi.
Courtesy of JFOODO

Shibumi

David Schlosser, and a hamachi dish with hoshigaki and ginger served on a wood board.
Chef David Schlosser and Shibumi’s hamachi dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

From Chef David Schlosser, Shibumi is a chic one-Michelin-starred kaiseki Japanese restaurant serving Kappo cuisine in the heart of DTLA. Diners will enjoy the parade of dishes, like the Japanese hamachi with hoshigaki and ginger, served on gorgeous ceramics imported from Japan. Complement the meal with a selection from the lengthy sake and shochu list, or try a classic cocktail made with Japanese spirits.

David Schlosser, and a hamachi dish with hoshigaki and ginger served on a wood board.
Chef David Schlosser and Shibumi’s hamachi dish.
Courtesy of JFOODO

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