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5 Vegas Restaurants for Serious Steak Geeks

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Las Vegas has always been known for its steakhouses, but the boys' clubs of yesterday have evolved into modern restaurants with enticing menus, impressive wine lists, and some of the best meat in the country. Forget wilted salads and standard-issue sides, today's hottest steak spots produce bold appetizers, mix craft cocktails, and turn the humble potato into something impossibly delicious. If you're all about the beef, these restaurants are all about you.

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Tom Colicchio's Craftsteak

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MGM Grand
You’ve spent years watching his bald head alternatively berate and cheer his Top Chef hopefuls, now here’s your chance to taste what the top dog is cooking. Spoiler alert: It’s beef — dry-aged ribeyes and porterhouses, domestic wagyu, and the A5 good stuff straight from Japan. No matter what you choose, mix and match your cut of cow with a wide variety of veggies, potatoes, mushrooms, and sauces until you create a perfect steakhouse meal that even Padma would appreciate.

Jean Georges Steakhouse

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ARIA
There’s something deliciously carnal about wielding a serious knife over a charred ribeye cooked on a wood-burning grill. At this ARIA eatery, chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten plays with the idea of the Vegas steakhouse, complementing top-quality cuts with subtle Asian flavors and decadent touches. While traditionalists will find staples like wedge salads and baked potatoes, if you’re game for a more adventurous meal, this modern meat spot will happily oblige.

STRIPSTEAK

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Mandalay Bay
Organic beef, tempered in butter, cooked over mesquite. That’s the way it’s done at Michael Mina’s Mandalay Bay steakhouse, where coddled cows from the US, Australia, and Japan can be ordered pristine or accompanied by one of 14 different toppings, from a classic béarnaise to a wasabi-horseradish crust to grilled foie gras. While meat is certainly the main event here, the bar boasts more than 100 single-malt scotches and Asian-influenced appetizers pack a punch, so consider Thai calamari ceviche or a whiskey flight before you challenge that chop.

Prime Steakhouse

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Bellagio
Prime is a fitting name for Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s original Vegas restaurant at Bellagio. It could describe the meat (bone-in ribeye and A5 wagyu), the view (lakeside with a front row-seat of the dancing fountains), or the menu as a whole (a classic steakhouse with plenty of seafood and occasional nods to Asia). It certainly covers the dining experience, an elegant, almost old-school style that evokes a more glamorous era of the city’s history.

Tom Colicchio's Heritage Steak

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The Mirage
The casual sister to Craftsteak, Heritage has a rustic, homier feel thanks to the open kitchen centered around a custom wood-burning stove. The restaurant is all about the American tradition of meat, so along with dry-aged porterhouse and grass-fed ribeye, you’ll find Colorado rack of lamb and a prime rib dinner that comes with caramelized onion jus, creamy horseradish, and Yorkshire pudding. Of course, this is Vegas, so there’s also imported wagyu, butter-poached lobster, and an interactive dessert dubbed the Ice Cream Social. The best way to end a killer steak dinner? With DIY ice cream bars, of course.
This advertising content was produced in collaboration between Vox Creative and our sponsor, without involvement from Vox Media editorial staff.

Tom Colicchio's Craftsteak

MGM Grand
You’ve spent years watching his bald head alternatively berate and cheer his Top Chef hopefuls, now here’s your chance to taste what the top dog is cooking. Spoiler alert: It’s beef — dry-aged ribeyes and porterhouses, domestic wagyu, and the A5 good stuff straight from Japan. No matter what you choose, mix and match your cut of cow with a wide variety of veggies, potatoes, mushrooms, and sauces until you create a perfect steakhouse meal that even Padma would appreciate.

Jean Georges Steakhouse

ARIA
There’s something deliciously carnal about wielding a serious knife over a charred ribeye cooked on a wood-burning grill. At this ARIA eatery, chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten plays with the idea of the Vegas steakhouse, complementing top-quality cuts with subtle Asian flavors and decadent touches. While traditionalists will find staples like wedge salads and baked potatoes, if you’re game for a more adventurous meal, this modern meat spot will happily oblige.

STRIPSTEAK

Mandalay Bay
Organic beef, tempered in butter, cooked over mesquite. That’s the way it’s done at Michael Mina’s Mandalay Bay steakhouse, where coddled cows from the US, Australia, and Japan can be ordered pristine or accompanied by one of 14 different toppings, from a classic béarnaise to a wasabi-horseradish crust to grilled foie gras. While meat is certainly the main event here, the bar boasts more than 100 single-malt scotches and Asian-influenced appetizers pack a punch, so consider Thai calamari ceviche or a whiskey flight before you challenge that chop.

Prime Steakhouse

Bellagio
Prime is a fitting name for Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s original Vegas restaurant at Bellagio. It could describe the meat (bone-in ribeye and A5 wagyu), the view (lakeside with a front row-seat of the dancing fountains), or the menu as a whole (a classic steakhouse with plenty of seafood and occasional nods to Asia). It certainly covers the dining experience, an elegant, almost old-school style that evokes a more glamorous era of the city’s history.

Tom Colicchio's Heritage Steak

The Mirage
The casual sister to Craftsteak, Heritage has a rustic, homier feel thanks to the open kitchen centered around a custom wood-burning stove. The restaurant is all about the American tradition of meat, so along with dry-aged porterhouse and grass-fed ribeye, you’ll find Colorado rack of lamb and a prime rib dinner that comes with caramelized onion jus, creamy horseradish, and Yorkshire pudding. Of course, this is Vegas, so there’s also imported wagyu, butter-poached lobster, and an interactive dessert dubbed the Ice Cream Social. The best way to end a killer steak dinner? With DIY ice cream bars, of course.

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