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A Dallas farmers market with rows of fruit (apples, oranges, peaches) for sale. Courtesy of John Turnow

The Best Farmers Markets In and Around Dallas

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Not many places showcase the rich bounty of Texas produce better than one of its many farmers markets — and luckily, thanks to a growing emphasis on slow food and farm-to-fork eating, it’s easier than ever to find juicy Texas peaches, ripe East Texas tomatoes, and succulent Angus beef that’s grazed on North Texas’ verdant pastures without visiting a giant supermarket. With hundreds of family-owned farms located in a small radius around Dallas that are easy to drive to, farmers markets offer an opportunity for vendors to showcase their top-quality products as well as for shoppers to buy food that just tastes better. Grab your market tote and read on to find out some of the “must-buys” at our favorite Dallas-area farmers markets.

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1. Frisco Fresh Market

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9215 John W. Elliott Dr
Frisco, TX 75034
(844) 776-2753
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If you want a taste of France, where noshing on a baguette while strolling through a farmers market is a part of everyday life, visit the Frisco Fresh Market. Inspired by Europe’s grand open-air markets, this market showcases more than 92 different vendors spread across 16,000 square feet. Any visit to the market will fill your trunk with produce ranging from juicy heirloom tomatoes to ripe Texas watermelon, but rarer finds like purple kohlrabi and French lavender essential oils that are grown and made locally are also available. Want to spice up your life? Try Cordie’s Blended Hot Peppers, a homemade pepper blend grown and jarred locally. Plus, if you’re looking to make the outing into an all-day affair, the Frisco Fresh Market is also home to a beer garden and a dozen unique specialty food vendors, slinging everything from ribs and brisket to homemade gumbo and traditional Mexican elotes.

Blueberries, blackberries, grapes, and oranges sit for sale at a stand at the Frisco Fresh Market, in Texas. Courtesy of Sutton Family Farms

2. Lucky Layla

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3721 Jupiter Rd
Plano, TX 75074
(214) 748-2912
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In 2004, third-generation farmer Todd Moore was selling his milk to a dairy processor when he decided he wanted to create a smaller, artisan product. Lucky Layla Farms, named after Layla, the family’s three-time national champion Guernsey cow, was born. Now, Moore’s drinkable yogurts (in flavors like peach, blackberry, and mango), raw milk, and golden butter are distributed at grocery stores across the region, but dedicated shoppers make the drive to Plano to buy direct from Moore’s storefront. Moore’s cows graze on pesticide-free pastures and are never fed hormones. Want to see for yourself? Visits to the family’s Lavon Farms, also in Plano, are encouraged. Here, you can get up close and personal with the full herd of Guernsey, Jersey, and Shorthorn cattle.

Bottles of Lucky Layla Farms milk sit on a wooden picnic table outside. Courtesy of Lucky Layla Farms

3. Georgia's Farmer's Market

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916 E 15th St
Plano, TX 75074
(972) 516-4765
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Located in Plano’s burgeoning Arts District, Georgia’s combines the relaxed feel of a farmers market with a family-owned grocery store. Cameron Satterthwaite took ownership of the market from his grandparents in 2018 and has continued with their mission of providing homegrown produce, locally-made jams, salsas, and other artisanal products to the community. Satterthwaite’s customers continue to shop at Georgia’s for the personalized customer service and genuine hospitality — he’s been known to call customers when their favorite items come into stock. On any given visit shoppers might find peaches from Pittsburg, Texas’ Efurd Orchards, shelled black-eyed peas, tomatoes grown in nearby Jacksonville, and Pecos cantaloupe, an irresistibly sweet variety that’s grown increasingly rare. If you’re lucky, there may even be a fresh tamale vendor on-site.

Cups of honey sticks for sale sit on a table at a stand at the Georgia’s Farmer’s Market, in Plano, Texas. Courtesy of Nan Palmero

4. Coppell Farmers Market

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768 W Main St
Coppell, TX 75019

Coppell’s year-round farmers market brings in vendors from across North Texas, selling dairy, eggs, and honey; fruits and vegetables; meats and seafood; and other non-edible, artisan products. Taylor Cooper’s humanely-raised Berkshire pork, sold under his Livestock First Ranch, is not to be missed, along with the cheese, butter, and yogurt from Jersey Girls Dairy. Toey Courtney and his family raise 120 (Jersey, natch) milking cows across 134 acres in Winnsboro. Add some veg to your market tote with goods from Delanco Farm, a six-acre chemical-free farm that offers heirloom produce grown sustainably. Need a snack for your drive home? Grab some rosemary-raisin crisps from Sandra Daniels’ Hippos & Hashbrowns stand. Made with organic whole wheat flour and local buttermilk, Daniels’ signature item is a must-have alongside some local cheese and a glass of wine.

5. NRH Farmer's Market

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7700 Davis Blvd
North Richland Hills, TX 76182
(817) 428-7075
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More of a traditional grocery than a farmers market, the North Richland Hills (NRH) Farmers Market is still a family-owned business that’s dedicated to showcasing the best of the best from local farmers and growers. The market sells your standard assortment of locally-grown produce (tomatoes, melons, and peaches are especially popular), but also homemade tortillas made nearby in Fort Worth, fresh chicken from Fran’s Fryers, a poultry farm in Milford, Texas, and fried pies from Arlington’s Mindy Lu’s bakery. North Richland Hills Farmers Market is also a top stop if you’re ready to test out your own green thumb — they sell locally-grown annuals, perennials, shrubs, and trees, alongside an assortment of herbs and starter produce.

6. Dallas Farmers Market

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920 S Harwood St
Dallas, TX 75201
(214) 664-9110
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Dallas’ oldest farmers market is also its largest. This 26,000 square-foot market showcases three different kinds of sellers: produce vendors, wholesalers, and local farmers — and while the first two can score you screaming deals on mangos and Mexican avocados, it’s the latter that you really shouldn’t miss if you’re looking to bring a taste of Texas to your table. Try some certified organic, hand-picked blueberries from Berry Best, based in Larue, Texas, or fire up your grill to cook a steak from Bois d’Arc Meat Company, based 90 minutes outside of Dallas in Windom. The family-run farm brings their beef, turkey, chicken, and pork products to the market each week.

A range of fresh produce — bananas, pineapples, watermelon, corn, tomatoes, apples — is lined up for sale at the Dallas Farmers Market in Texas. Courtesy of Allen Sheffield

7. Grand Prairie Farmers Market

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120 W Main St
Grand Prairie, TX 75050
(972) 237-4599
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Grand Prairie’s farmers market is held weekly on Saturdays, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the city’s Market Square. Designed to look like a red barn with a corrugated tin roof (fitting for the region), the pavilion houses vendors selling everything from produce to honey to fresh pasta, all grown or made within a 150-mile radius. One of the most popular items? El Paco’s Mexican-style corn chips and homemade salsas produced in nearby Arlington from corn that’s grown locally. If you simply can’t get enough salsa in your life, the market also holds an annual Downtown Salsa Showdown, where individuals and businesses alike compete for the title of Salsa Showdown Champion.

Courtesy of Michael Barera
This advertising content was produced in collaboration between Vox Creative and our sponsor, without involvement from Vox Media editorial staff.

1. Frisco Fresh Market

9215 John W. Elliott Dr, Frisco, TX 75034
Blueberries, blackberries, grapes, and oranges sit for sale at a stand at the Frisco Fresh Market, in Texas. Courtesy of Sutton Family Farms

If you want a taste of France, where noshing on a baguette while strolling through a farmers market is a part of everyday life, visit the Frisco Fresh Market. Inspired by Europe’s grand open-air markets, this market showcases more than 92 different vendors spread across 16,000 square feet. Any visit to the market will fill your trunk with produce ranging from juicy heirloom tomatoes to ripe Texas watermelon, but rarer finds like purple kohlrabi and French lavender essential oils that are grown and made locally are also available. Want to spice up your life? Try Cordie’s Blended Hot Peppers, a homemade pepper blend grown and jarred locally. Plus, if you’re looking to make the outing into an all-day affair, the Frisco Fresh Market is also home to a beer garden and a dozen unique specialty food vendors, slinging everything from ribs and brisket to homemade gumbo and traditional Mexican elotes.

9215 John W. Elliott Dr
Frisco, TX 75034

2. Lucky Layla

3721 Jupiter Rd, Plano, TX 75074
Bottles of Lucky Layla Farms milk sit on a wooden picnic table outside. Courtesy of Lucky Layla Farms

In 2004, third-generation farmer Todd Moore was selling his milk to a dairy processor when he decided he wanted to create a smaller, artisan product. Lucky Layla Farms, named after Layla, the family’s three-time national champion Guernsey cow, was born. Now, Moore’s drinkable yogurts (in flavors like peach, blackberry, and mango), raw milk, and golden butter are distributed at grocery stores across the region, but dedicated shoppers make the drive to Plano to buy direct from Moore’s storefront. Moore’s cows graze on pesticide-free pastures and are never fed hormones. Want to see for yourself? Visits to the family’s Lavon Farms, also in Plano, are encouraged. Here, you can get up close and personal with the full herd of Guernsey, Jersey, and Shorthorn cattle.

3721 Jupiter Rd
Plano, TX 75074

3. Georgia's Farmer's Market

916 E 15th St, Plano, TX 75074
Cups of honey sticks for sale sit on a table at a stand at the Georgia’s Farmer’s Market, in Plano, Texas. Courtesy of Nan Palmero

Located in Plano’s burgeoning Arts District, Georgia’s combines the relaxed feel of a farmers market with a family-owned grocery store. Cameron Satterthwaite took ownership of the market from his grandparents in 2018 and has continued with their mission of providing homegrown produce, locally-made jams, salsas, and other artisanal products to the community. Satterthwaite’s customers continue to shop at Georgia’s for the personalized customer service and genuine hospitality — he’s been known to call customers when their favorite items come into stock. On any given visit shoppers might find peaches from Pittsburg, Texas’ Efurd Orchards, shelled black-eyed peas, tomatoes grown in nearby Jacksonville, and Pecos cantaloupe, an irresistibly sweet variety that’s grown increasingly rare. If you’re lucky, there may even be a fresh tamale vendor on-site.

916 E 15th St
Plano, TX 75074

4. Coppell Farmers Market

768 W Main St, Coppell, TX 75019

Coppell’s year-round farmers market brings in vendors from across North Texas, selling dairy, eggs, and honey; fruits and vegetables; meats and seafood; and other non-edible, artisan products. Taylor Cooper’s humanely-raised Berkshire pork, sold under his Livestock First Ranch, is not to be missed, along with the cheese, butter, and yogurt from Jersey Girls Dairy. Toey Courtney and his family raise 120 (Jersey, natch) milking cows across 134 acres in Winnsboro. Add some veg to your market tote with goods from Delanco Farm, a six-acre chemical-free farm that offers heirloom produce grown sustainably. Need a snack for your drive home? Grab some rosemary-raisin crisps from Sandra Daniels’ Hippos & Hashbrowns stand. Made with organic whole wheat flour and local buttermilk, Daniels’ signature item is a must-have alongside some local cheese and a glass of wine.

768 W Main St
Coppell, TX 75019

5. NRH Farmer's Market

7700 Davis Blvd, North Richland Hills, TX 76182

More of a traditional grocery than a farmers market, the North Richland Hills (NRH) Farmers Market is still a family-owned business that’s dedicated to showcasing the best of the best from local farmers and growers. The market sells your standard assortment of locally-grown produce (tomatoes, melons, and peaches are especially popular), but also homemade tortillas made nearby in Fort Worth, fresh chicken from Fran’s Fryers, a poultry farm in Milford, Texas, and fried pies from Arlington’s Mindy Lu’s bakery. North Richland Hills Farmers Market is also a top stop if you’re ready to test out your own green thumb — they sell locally-grown annuals, perennials, shrubs, and trees, alongside an assortment of herbs and starter produce.

7700 Davis Blvd
North Richland Hills, TX 76182

6. Dallas Farmers Market

920 S Harwood St, Dallas, TX 75201
A range of fresh produce — bananas, pineapples, watermelon, corn, tomatoes, apples — is lined up for sale at the Dallas Farmers Market in Texas. Courtesy of Allen Sheffield

Dallas’ oldest farmers market is also its largest. This 26,000 square-foot market showcases three different kinds of sellers: produce vendors, wholesalers, and local farmers — and while the first two can score you screaming deals on mangos and Mexican avocados, it’s the latter that you really shouldn’t miss if you’re looking to bring a taste of Texas to your table. Try some certified organic, hand-picked blueberries from Berry Best, based in Larue, Texas, or fire up your grill to cook a steak from Bois d’Arc Meat Company, based 90 minutes outside of Dallas in Windom. The family-run farm brings their beef, turkey, chicken, and pork products to the market each week.

920 S Harwood St
Dallas, TX 75201

7. Grand Prairie Farmers Market

120 W Main St, Grand Prairie, TX 75050
Courtesy of Michael Barera

Grand Prairie’s farmers market is held weekly on Saturdays, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the city’s Market Square. Designed to look like a red barn with a corrugated tin roof (fitting for the region), the pavilion houses vendors selling everything from produce to honey to fresh pasta, all grown or made within a 150-mile radius. One of the most popular items? El Paco’s Mexican-style corn chips and homemade salsas produced in nearby Arlington from corn that’s grown locally. If you simply can’t get enough salsa in your life, the market also holds an annual Downtown Salsa Showdown, where individuals and businesses alike compete for the title of Salsa Showdown Champion.

120 W Main St
Grand Prairie, TX 75050

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